To do this requires prioritizing your aims. For example:

  • Are you looking to gain fans?
  • Do you want to capture email addresses?
  • Is your priority to communicate your concept?

Whatever your overall goals are, they will need to be decided on a case by case basis, but everything comes down to what you want to achieve, and therefore what you need to test. Deciding what you should test requires you ask yourself two questions:

  1. The first question is: what is it I want to promote in priority to those visitors who don’t know me?

This question leads you to think about your unique selling propositions:

  • What is your added value?
  • What do you offer that’s unique, and inimitable?
  • Which of these is the most attractive to my target market?

These are important questions, and asking them often opens up a strategic thought process about what you want, where you’re going, and how to get there.

2. The second question is: what is the added value my visitors expect from me?

After all, what they expect may not be in line with what you think you want. By testing different messages, you can take a good hard look at the reality of your market, as opposed to relying purely on your own vision, or your assumption of what it wants. For example:

  • What if you want to focus primarily on boosting your fan page, but it’s of no interest to your visitors?
  • What if you want to communicate promotions to your visitors, but what they’re looking for are actionable snippets of advice, information, tips or tricks?

It’s only by testing that you’ll find out whether your vision, and that of your market, is in line. It’s only by testing that you’ll find out what your market actually wants, and can then tailor your approach to meet their needs.