We love exit popups.

Why?

Because they’re so powerful!

On average our customers report a +100% increase in their list building efforts when they set up exit popups. Convinced?

Let’s review 20 examples of exit popups you can copy.

 

Exit email popups

Let’s start with exit opt-in popups, in other words, email capture popups.

Lush.com

We love this exit popup displayed on lush.com. The design makes it unmissable. And their humour just makes us want to subscribe right away.

an exit popup on lush.com

Mic.com

This modal displayed on Trump-related articles is both very visible and highly adapted to its context. If you’ve read one article about Trump, chances are you might be interested in receiving a newsletter including Trump news. Smart!

an exit popup displayed on mic.com

 

WorldOfWatches

WOW went for a full size popup (a good way to make sure the visitors won’t miss it). And the visual they added made it simply stunning. They also included a visible discount to convince the most reluctant users to subscribe. Could anyone resist it?

an exit intent popup on WorldOfWatches

Leesa.com

We love this popup. First because everyone loves a $100 discount. Then, because the popup style perfectly matches Leesa’s visual identity.

The CTA is also very efficient. Does it say “Submit my email” or “Subscribe”? No, it associates the subscription with a direct benefit for the user, the offer (actually this one of the techniques recommended to create good call-to-actions)

Leesa's exit popup

Hidrate Spark

Hidrate Spark has included all the good elements of an irresistible exit popup:

  • A discount
  • Some sense of urgency (“If you sign up now!”)
  • A positive call-to-action mentioning the benefit for the subscriber
  • A testimonial to remind subscribers of the benefits of the product

an exit popup on HidrateSpark

 

Basic Outfitters

Basic Outfitters have added a catchy headline to their creation, a quick reminder of the benefits of subscribing (including a power word, “surprising”) and an attractive visual.

Their popup is a good example of a classic exit popup which works.

An exit popup example on BasicOutfitters.com

StyleRunner

If there was any such thing as popup marketing courses, this popup should be part of the curriculum. StyleRunner has included all the ingredients for a high-converting popup:

  • The headline “Join the squad” creates a sense of community. You’re not only subscribing, you’re joining a movement.
  • The second headline insists on the discount (quick reminder, discounts are still the best way to help convert customers according to a DealNerd Study)
  • The copy insists on all the benefits of joining the newsletters and leverages the fear of missing out (who would want to risk missing out on new arrivals, limited editions, etc.)
  • The call-to-action highlights the immediate benefit of joining the newsletter (getting the offer delivered to one’s inbox)

StyleRunner.com popup

Backlinko

This popup by star blogger Brian Dean does a very good job of sharing a problem (“How can I get more visitors to join my website”) and providing an immediate solution.

Notice also how the ebook is presented as a hardcover book. It certainly looks better than a PDF icon, don’t you think?

an exit intent popup on Backlinko

Five Four Club

This one doesn’t even need a comment. It’s gorgeous and simply does its job.
An exit message on Five Four Club

Marie Claire

Combine a stunning visual representing the luxury universe and a good offer (50 beauty tips) and you get MC’s popup.

An exit popup example on Marie-Claire

Inkbox

Inkbox leverages the power of exit popups and adds the power of sweepstakes. Is it surprising to see that this campaign converts almost 1 in 5 people to subscribe? No!

An exit popup on Shopify store Inkbox

JarJackets

There’s nothing better than adding a bit of fun to convince subscribers to join. Displaying this wheel of fortune on exit, JJ is sure to engage its visitors and capture their email address in no time.

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Le Creuset

Le Creuset does an amazing job with this simple exit intent. Their recipe is simple: 50% fear of missing out (“know what’s new with Le Creuset”) and 50% good offer (Free shipping).

An exit modal on Le Creuset

Cart abandonment exit popups

Sure exit popups are great to collect emails. But they can also help combat cart abandonment. See how these websites increase their conversion rate with these smart cart abandonment popups.

GlobeIn.com

A good offer and a simple call-to-action. That’s what GlobeIn uses to convince shoppers to complete their purchase.

GlobeIn's exit message

Pixelme.me

It might sound simple but offering “a surprise” can be a very convincing offer. Pixelme.me converts 4.7% of the users who see this popup into subscribers. Not bad!

an exit popup on PixelMe.me

Brooks Brothers:

Free shipping is still the primary motivator for purchasing from a specific retailer in the US, according to eMarketer. That’s why Brooks Brothers’ popup is so brilliant. It solves a real problem for their potential customers and provides a strong incentive to complete their order.

Brooks Brothers' Cart Abandonment popup

TheCeShop

Simple, yet effective, displaying a big coupon on the cart page when the visitors are about to leave is one sure way to convince them to proceed to the payment.

a cart abandonment popup on theceshop.com

Xero Shoes

Displaying a time-limited offer ranks among the most convincing ways to convert a visitor now. Guess what Xero Shoes is doing with their popup? They offer a coupon which expires after 3 minutes.

A time-limited pffer displayed on exit on Xero Shoes

Kate Somerville

2 offers for the price of one. By offering a discount and a gift, KS’ team provides an irresistible incentive to buy TODAY (remember the importance of timing?)

An exit popup on KateSommerville.com

Wrap-up

We hope this selection inspired you. If you think we missed a good example, feel free to suggest it in the comments, we’ll be happy to add it to our selection.
Ready to build your own exit popup? Sign up today (14-day free trial, no credit card required) and create your first exit popup in 5 clicks.

  • Greg d'Aboville