25 inspiring Shopify Popup Examples You Can Steal

In the past few years, Shopify popups have become a standard for stores using the platform to grow the email list, reduce cart abandonment, deliver coupon codes, free gifts or offer customer support, among other benefits. 

But anyone who’s ever tried creating popups for Shopify would attest, engaging customers visiting the site to collect their email addresses is harder than it seems. 

That’s why we’ve created this guide. Below, you’ll find 25 inspiring pop-up designs utilizing the best practices in converting target customers into a mailing list and more.

But why use Shopify popups?

It’s simple – because popups are the most effective strategy to achieve all the benefits I’ve outlined above. Their popularity only proves my point.

For example, to prepare this selection, we reviewed 218 Shopify stores. About 40% of them used popups or bars, most of them displayed on landing.

The Shopify App Store further attests to the popups adoption. It features almost 50 different popup apps.

But not all popups were created equal. Our research made us realize that a lot of Shopify stores, even established brands, still use popups that are not optimized for conversions.

Some ask for too many details (see the example below), a lot don’t reward subscribers, and most of them use very basic targeting.

A Shopify popup on Bremont Watches

A long popup form on Bremont.com

 

I hope this selection will help you do better!

Note: We tried our best to include all sorts of popup examples: from a simple modal popup window to lightbox popups, to exit popups, and newsletter popups. Feel free to suggest more formats/examples!

A Quick Run Through of Shopify Popups Best Practices

Popups don’t always enjoy a great reputation. Many visitors complain about how pop-ups disturb their shopping experience.
You can prevent it though, and still deliver successful popup campaigns if you follow these simple rules:

  • Use a dedicated Shopify pop-up app. It will be optimized for speed and usability, and won’t affect your site’s performance.
  • Consider when you’re displaying popups. Your offer doesn’t have to appear the moment someone lands on the site. In fact, the most successful popup campaigns target visitors who have engaged with your content or products already.
  • Match the offer to a specific target customer segment. Do not launch a single popup to engage all visitors. Those people would have different reasons for landing on the site, and the more you match the popup to that intent, the more emails you’ll collect.

So, without any further ado, here are 25 Shopify pop-up examples for your inspiration.

Email Popups

Let’s start with the best examples of newsletter popups we’ve found on Shopify stores and see what they can teach you about list-building.

Fulton & Roark

This popup displayed on Fulton & Roark contains a lot of interesting elements:

  • A visible headline that states the reward for new subscribers
  • A short sentence that details what the newsletter is all about
  • A closing option that plays on the fear of missing out
  • An overlay to help visitors focus on the popup

Plus it’s simple; with the right pop-up app, anyone could design this kind of popup.

Fulton & Roark's popup

 

Wrightwood furniture

Let’s state the obvious: This popup design could be vastly improved.

But two elements got our attention:

Wrightwood Furniture's newsletter popup

Hem

Does your popup need visuals? Well, this example proves that’s not always the case. The colors are stunning, contrast with the background (making the popup more visible) and match the website color theme. Plus, as it doesn’t include any pictures, it loads super fast (which is important to take into account given the importance of load time on conversions).

Not only is their design eye-catching, but their copy also conveys all the potential benefits of subscribing to Hem’s newsletter.

If I ever publish a book about popups, I will probably pick this one for the cover.

Hem's email popup

Pipcorn

A lot of webmasters are concerned about popups. They fear they may annoy users, hurt their brand or decrease conversion rate.

If that’s your case, you should like Pipcorn’s example. Displayed at the bottom-right corner of the screen, it doesn’t hide anything important on the page. A true example of what a non-intrusive popup can be.

Pipcorn's side popup

Tigerlily Swimwear & Beachwear

Yes, visuals can take a few milliseconds to load (we don’t have enough time to develop this topic, but please keep in mind that popups generally don’t affect your website loading time).

But that’s forgotten when you see the result. This example on Tigerlily is especially interesting:

  • Their visual reminds us that the popup is part of the navigation experience (to put it simply, they sell swimwear and their popup features a woman in a swimsuit).
  • Its black and white colors make it contrast with the colorful background, thus making it more visible.

Tigerlily Swimwear's email popup

Gaiam

Most of the time, Shopify popups look a lot like newsletter boxes. Most of them have a square form and lack visuals.

That’s why we love this rounded popup on Gaiam. The extra graphics on the border make it even more appealing.

That’s what we call thinking outside the box.

Gaiam's rounded popup

 

Grenco Science

Again, we didn’t pick this popup because of its design.

But because of the sign-up options. Grenco science offers three options to sign up: email (of course), Facebook and Twitter. I guess it couldn’t be easier for someone to sign up for their newsletter. Plus the 20% off offer can’t hurt.

Grenco Science's sign up popup form

The Flex Company

This is another basic popup in terms of design. But we included it in the selection because The Flex Company is making good use of an opportunity to build their email list: foreign visitors.

Instead of simply stating that the company doesn’t ship to foreign countries, it invites foreign visitors to sign up. We can assume it will make their opening in foreign countries much easier (when the time comes).

The Flex Company's email popup

Beardbrand

Beardbrand took a very original approach to popups.

Instead of displaying theirs right away or on exit like most stores do, they added an email icon with a notification. When clicked, it reveals the popup. 100% non-intrusive, and the notification style makes it almost irresistible. Plus it’s compliant with Google’s guidelines for mobile interstitials.

Step 1:

Beardbrand 1

Step 2:

Beardbrand 2

Alpine Labs

After focusing on design and wording, let’s focus on incentives (some marketers call them lead magnets). They play an important role, as most users won’t say no to an extra reason to sign up for your mailing list.

And if you don’t have a budget to spend on coupons, a little creativity can help. The example below comes from Alpine Labs, an online store selling photo accessories. Notice their incentive? It’s a promise to improve your photography skills. It speaks well to their audience (and costs them nothing). How smart!

Alpine Labs' email popup

Inkbox

If you don’t have any content to share, sweepstakes are a good alternative.

This one comes from one of the largest Shopify stores: Inkbox. It’s one of the best performing campaigns across all our customers’ accounts.

See how they used a link to allow the users to close the popup instead of the traditional closing [ X ]? It helps us make sure the users have to scan the popup before they dismiss it. Sure, it’s a controversial technique (UX designers recommend using a visible way for the user to escape a modal). But it may be worth a test.

A lightbox popup on Inkbox

UGMonk

If you don’t have hundreds of dollars to spend on coupons, why not offer a simple tee-shirt? It’s a bit cheap, but it works!

Ugmonk's giveaway popup

 

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Newsletter Bars

We’ve been supplying popups to Shopify stores for more than four years. What struck us during this review is the rise of email bars. For a long time, popups were everywhere. Now it looks like a lot of websites are switching to bars.

This evolution makes sense, as email bars:

Let’s review these Shopify bar examples together.

Kylie Cosmetics

This design is very interesting for a couple of reasons:

  • Its position: By displaying the popup at the bottom of the screen, Kylie Cosmetics’ team made sure the bar would be visible even when the user scrolls down
  • Its colors: By using black on a mostly gray website, they successfully attract visitors’ attention to the bar

Kylie Jenner Cosmetics' email Bar

Zorrata

This bar design is simple. But they clearly state what the subscriber will receive (exclusive news and offers) and use the fear of missing out to perfection. As a visitor, you feel you might miss an opportunity that will not be offered again.

Zorrata's email bar

Drunk Elephant

Again, this one is pretty simple (most bars are), but the flashy background colors and the touch of humor (“this is the part where we ask for your email”) convinced us to include it in this selection.

Drunk Elephant's bottom bar

Luvo

You’ll notice that this bar is positioned on top of the screen. Usually, this is not a position we recommend, unless it’s displayed on all pages (which is not the case here).

But its contrasting colors and humorous tone convinced us to include it.

Luvo's top bar

Thinx

Thinx sells a product which can be hard to sell: period-proof underwear. Their unique wording turns a potentially sensitive subject into something you can laugh about.

Their headline is pure genius. The simplicity of this bar makes it look extremely good on mobile devices as well. Looks like they killed two birds with one stone.

Thinx's email bar

Tattly

Let’s finish with this MailChimp popup example. We love it, not only because we love Freddy (MailChimp’s mascot), but because of this GIF-animated background. It adds movement and life to a support that’s usually mostly static. Plus it reminds us of the animated Tattly logo.

Tattly's MailChimp popup

 

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Exit Popups

If you’re not familiar with exit popups, they’re modals displayed just before the visitor leaves a web page.

Here’s a quick illustration of how they display:

Furless

Source: Furless.com

Why are they worth a separate category?

Because they usually differ a lot from “traditional popups” in terms of design. Since they’re displayed at the last minute, they’re usually very large to attract the user’s attention and convince her to stay. Most of the time, marketers use lightbox popups on exit, to limit distractions.

Let’s see some examples.

Baubax

True, this popup could be a simple email popup. But the lightbox effect (background is dimmed), the generous incentive and the unusual (and unmissable shape) make it an excellent example of an exit popup.

BauBax's exit popup

Luxy Hair

We picked this exit-intent popup on Luxy Hair, one of the most respected Shopify stores. Again, you find that it is using the classic overlay effect that comes with most exit modals. But two elements clearly stand out. First, there is the catchy headline (“Leaving so soon?”) that speaks well to visitors who are about to leave the website. Then, there’s the visual that makes the popup more appealing and branded.

An exit intent popup on Luxy Hair, A leading shopify store

 

Long’s Jewelers

Sometimes you can buy an email with a coupon. Sometimes you can simply play on the site visitors’ curiosity and their thirst for knowledge.

Given Long’s Jewelers’ target–young couples about to get married–we found this lead magnet especially relevant. Well done, LJ!

Longs Jewelers' exit popup

Greats

Here’s another good example of a lightbox popup displayed on exit.

We love it because it gives two options to sign up: email AND text. Interesting!

Also, the wording “Qualify” gives pause: It suggests that you’re eligible today but may not get this offer ever again.

Greats' lightbox popup

 

JewelStreet

This last exit-intent popup example is one of my favorites. And there is a fabulous story behind its success.

The JewelStreet team realized that the highest converting page on their Shopify store was the best-selling items page. What did they do next? They created an exit message in the women’s jewelry category to invite visitors to check their bestsellers before leaving the site. It’s cheap, simple to implement…and it works!

Jewelstreet's exit-intent popup

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Mobile Popups

Mobile popups are almost a separate world. This requires following specific rules. I won’t go into the details about mobile popups in this article because we’ve already written an extensive guide about them.
But we thought that sharing some good examples of mobile modals could help. Here we go!

 

Good American

Good American is one of the best performing Shopify stores worldwide. And their mobile popup is an excellent example of good design. It takes a reasonable amount of screen estate, its message is short and clear, and its black background makes it unmissable.

A mobile popup on Goodamerican.com, a leading Shopify store

Tula

This example comes from Tula, an online skin care store. Using a pink background, they made this small popup super visible. And from a visitor’s standpoint, the offer they included is irresistible!

Tula's mobile popup, displayed on their homepage

Wrap-up

Ready to supercharge your Shopify store with popups?

Give WisePops a try! We’re Shopify’s top-rated popup app. And you can test us risk-free: we offer a 14-day free trial and don’t ask for your credit card.

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